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Sidelong Glance
Sidelong Glance


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Like a randy nun, I lead a quiet, sequestered life of piety and perversion. Like a cantankerous hag, I scorn the bustle of society and probably eat stray children. I am devoted to Krishna because he's a bigger, naughtier fiend than myself, which commands my respect, and I strive to serve him through transcendental immorality. I spend a lot of time idly scowling and looking at the ugly trees around my home. Also, I have a face, but it's not much to look at.

KRSNA


Hare Krishna
Hare Krishna
Krishna Krishna
Hare Hare
Hare Rama
Hare Rama
Rama Rama
Hare Hare



thatmeansprogress:

Upon hearing the transcendental song of Krishna’s flute, the otherwise chaste gopis abandon their husbands and rush in to the forest, following the sound to meet Krishna. Upon seeing a lone Krishna playing his long murali-flute in the otherwise quiet grove they become ecstatic and all wish to dance with him, Krishna being ever merciful to the desires of his lovers suddenly appears in many forms to dance with each of them. Not wanting the ecstatic dance to end, this one night is mystically extended to be as long as a day of Brahmaji. Whereas it may seem Krishna dances with the wives of other men, his lovers being his infinite shakti, he merely dances with his own shadows.

thatmeansprogress:

Upon hearing the transcendental song of Krishna’s flute, the otherwise chaste gopis abandon their husbands and rush in to the forest, following the sound to meet Krishna. Upon seeing a lone Krishna playing his long murali-flute in the otherwise quiet grove they become ecstatic and all wish to dance with him, Krishna being ever merciful to the desires of his lovers suddenly appears in many forms to dance with each of them. Not wanting the ecstatic dance to end, this one night is mystically extended to be as long as a day of Brahmaji. Whereas it may seem Krishna dances with the wives of other men, his lovers being his infinite shakti, he merely dances with his own shadows.
















106 O Radha, when will the auspicious day come when my hands will draw pictures on Your breasts, my feet follow You as You go to meet Your beloved, and my eyes see Your secret pastimes in the forest?
 
107 O Sri Radha, when will I celebrate a nectar festival of being eligible to hear Your playful intimate conversations with Your lover, to take You by the hand and lead You to Your lover’s bed, and to retie Your braids undone in Your amorous pastimes?
 
108 Glory to the playful rasika couple, who with charming smiles and laughter enjoy pastimes of hide-and-seek in Vrndavana’s forest groves filled with the always-new nectar of bliss and the humming of bumblebees.
 
109 O Radha whose face is more glorious than millions of autumn moons, the fragrance of whose jasmine-braided hair makes the bumblebees go wild, whose conchshell necklace is splendid with a necklace, the vines of whose delicate arms hold moving bracelets, who is dressed in splendid silk garments, and whose lotus feet hold tinkling anklets, when will I see Your wonderful form?
 
110 O my queen, when will I say to You, “You threw away fear, shyness, glory, Your family’s reputation and a host of other shackles in order to be with Him!” and when will You, bewildered, stuttering, and laughing, angrily reply, “When did I do that? When?”

106 O Radha, when will the auspicious day come when my hands will draw pictures on Your breasts, my feet follow You as You go to meet Your beloved, and my eyes see Your secret pastimes in the forest?

 

107 O Sri Radha, when will I celebrate a nectar festival of being eligible to hear Your playful intimate conversations with Your lover, to take You by the hand and lead You to Your lover’s bed, and to retie Your braids undone in Your amorous pastimes?

 

108 Glory to the playful rasika couple, who with charming smiles and laughter enjoy pastimes of hide-and-seek in Vrndavana’s forest groves filled with the always-new nectar of bliss and the humming of bumblebees.

 

109 O Radha whose face is more glorious than millions of autumn moons, the fragrance of whose jasmine-braided hair makes the bumblebees go wild, whose conchshell necklace is splendid with a necklace, the vines of whose delicate arms hold moving bracelets, who is dressed in splendid silk garments, and whose lotus feet hold tinkling anklets, when will I see Your wonderful form?

 

110 O my queen, when will I say to You, “You threw away fear, shyness, glory, Your family’s reputation and a host of other shackles in order to be with Him!” and when will You, bewildered, stuttering, and laughing, angrily reply, “When did I do that? When?”







101 O Sri Radha, O goddess with glistening curly black hair, glistening bimba-fruit lips, a moonlike face, playful khanjana bird eyes, a splendid pearl in the tip of Your nose, broad hips, slender waist, splendid breasts, a host of wonderful glories, and vine-arms decorated with graceful armlets, please appear before me.
 
102 In the newly fashioned stage of Sri Radha’s limbs a play will now be performed. The curtain of shyness now rises. A smile now offers a handful of flowers. Youthfulness speaks graceful words of prologue. The king of love enters and sits on the golden throne of Her hips. Now playful sidelong glances show their wonderful skill in wild dancing.
 
103 May Sri Sri Radha-Madhava’s festival of love, where there is a great wonder of beauty and where there are new youthfulness, charm, skill in the playing among the waves of many pastimes, and places of great wonder, and where there is now awe, reverence, or unapproachableness, protect you all.
 
104 Will I someday gaze on Sri Radha’s footprints, which are the abodes of wonderful nectar and glory, and which cloud-dark Mukunda, whose form is filled with the sweetest bliss, lovingly searches for in Vrndavana forest.
 
105 O Radha, when will I look on as the jewel of rasikas forcibly drags You to the bed, drinks the nectar of Your lips, with sharp fingernails scratches Your full breasts, throws away Your belt, and holds You in His hands in an opening of the forest?

101 O Sri Radha, O goddess with glistening curly black hair, glistening bimba-fruit lips, a moonlike face, playful khanjana bird eyes, a splendid pearl in the tip of Your nose, broad hips, slender waist, splendid breasts, a host of wonderful glories, and vine-arms decorated with graceful armlets, please appear before me.

 

102 In the newly fashioned stage of Sri Radha’s limbs a play will now be performed. The curtain of shyness now rises. A smile now offers a handful of flowers. Youthfulness speaks graceful words of prologue. The king of love enters and sits on the golden throne of Her hips. Now playful sidelong glances show their wonderful skill in wild dancing.

 

103 May Sri Sri Radha-Madhava’s festival of love, where there is a great wonder of beauty and where there are new youthfulness, charm, skill in the playing among the waves of many pastimes, and places of great wonder, and where there is now awe, reverence, or unapproachableness, protect you all.

 

104 Will I someday gaze on Sri Radha’s footprints, which are the abodes of wonderful nectar and glory, and which cloud-dark Mukunda, whose form is filled with the sweetest bliss, lovingly searches for in Vrndavana forest.

 

105 O Radha, when will I look on as the jewel of rasikas forcibly drags You to the bed, drinks the nectar of Your lips, with sharp fingernails scratches Your full breasts, throws away Your belt, and holds You in His hands in an opening of the forest?










Shani is one of the Navagraha, or nine celestial deities associated with the planets in Vedic astrology. Shani corresponds with Saturn, and his influence brings ill-luck, misfortune, and judgement for misdeeds. His father is Surya, the sun god, and his brother is Yama, the god of death. He is feared for his malefic power, and revered and worshipped in order to appease his stern gaze. He is a dedicated devotee of Krishna, and there is an interesting story about Shani and Krishna:

When Krishna was born many gods and rishis visited Nandgaon. Shani was among them. Everyone was allowed to have Krishna’s darshan, but not Shanidev. He was not allowed to see the baby. Yashoda stopped him at the door and said: “Your name is fearful; your form fierce. If my infant-son sees you, he will be frightened.”

Dismayed and disappointed, Shanidev went to a nearby forest. There he prayed: “O God! I am your servant. You have appointed me to judge and punish sinners according to their karmas. Then why does everybody think of me as being malignant and cruel; why do they avoid even my shadow? Today, when all gods and demi-gods could enjoy the bliss of your darshan, I am denied that right and benediction.”

Touched, Krishna manifested Himself to him. He advised him to stay put near Nandanvan. He granted him the boon that anyone who came to his temple to pray would immediately be freed from all worries and afflictions. Eventually, Krishna visited the temple and began playing the divine flute. The many gopis who collected there turned ecstatic at seeing Krishna but He suddenly disappeared. Unable to find Him, the gopis began to cry. Krishna turned himself into a koyal (cuckoo) and he advised them to remain calm. Consoled thus, the gopis went home. That part of the forest where Krishna appeared before Shanidev has since been called Kokilavan. Today, one can visit the renowned Shani temple there.

Shani is one of the Navagraha, or nine celestial deities associated with the planets in Vedic astrology. Shani corresponds with Saturn, and his influence brings ill-luck, misfortune, and judgement for misdeeds. His father is Surya, the sun god, and his brother is Yama, the god of death. He is feared for his malefic power, and revered and worshipped in order to appease his stern gaze. He is a dedicated devotee of Krishna, and there is an interesting story about Shani and Krishna:

When Krishna was born many gods and rishis visited Nandgaon. Shani was among them. Everyone was allowed to have Krishna’s darshan, but not Shanidev. He was not allowed to see the baby. Yashoda stopped him at the door and said: “Your name is fearful; your form fierce. If my infant-son sees you, he will be frightened.”

Dismayed and disappointed, Shanidev went to a nearby forest. There he prayed: “O God! I am your servant. You have appointed me to judge and punish sinners according to their karmas. Then why does everybody think of me as being malignant and cruel; why do they avoid even my shadow? Today, when all gods and demi-gods could enjoy the bliss of your darshan, I am denied that right and benediction.”

Touched, Krishna manifested Himself to him. He advised him to stay put near Nandanvan. He granted him the boon that anyone who came to his temple to pray would immediately be freed from all worries and afflictions. Eventually, Krishna visited the temple and began playing the divine flute. The many gopis who collected there turned ecstatic at seeing Krishna but He suddenly disappeared. Unable to find Him, the gopis began to cry. Krishna turned himself into a koyal (cuckoo) and he advised them to remain calm. Consoled thus, the gopis went home. That part of the forest where Krishna appeared before Shanidev has since been called Kokilavan. Today, one can visit the renowned Shani temple there.




Devaki, on seeing her brother approaching, prayed in a very meek attitude to Kamsa: “My dear brother, please do not kill this female child. I promise that this child will be the wife of your son; therefore don’t kill her. You are not to be killed by any female child. That was the omen. You are to be killed by a male child, so please do not kill her. My dear brother, you have killed so many of my children who were just born, shining as the sun. That is not your fault. You have been advised by demoniac friends to kill my children. But now I beg you to excuse this girl. Let her live as my daughter.”
Kamsa was so cruel that he did not listen to the beautiful prayers of his sister Devaki. He forcibly grabbed the newborn child to rebuke his sister and attempted to dash her on the stone mercilessly. This is a graphic example of a cruel brother who could sacrifice all relationships for the sake of personal gratification. But immediately the child slipped out of his hands, went up in the sky and appeared with eight arms as the younger sister of Visnu. She was decorated with a nice dress and flower garlands and ornaments; in her eight hands she held a bow, lancet, arrows, bell, conchshell, disc, club and shield.
Seeing the appearance of the child (who was actually the goddess Durga), all the demigods from different planets like Siddhaloka, Caranaloka, Gandharvaloka, Apsaroloka, Kinnaraloka, and Uragaloka presented her articles and began to offer their respective prayers. From above, the goddess addressed Kamsa: “You rascal, how can you kill me? The child who will kill you is already born before me somewhere within this world. Don’t be so cruel to your poor sister.” After this appearance, the goddess Durga became known by various names in various parts of the world.

Devaki, on seeing her brother approaching, prayed in a very meek attitude to Kamsa: “My dear brother, please do not kill this female child. I promise that this child will be the wife of your son; therefore don’t kill her. You are not to be killed by any female child. That was the omen. You are to be killed by a male child, so please do not kill her. My dear brother, you have killed so many of my children who were just born, shining as the sun. That is not your fault. You have been advised by demoniac friends to kill my children. But now I beg you to excuse this girl. Let her live as my daughter.”

Kamsa was so cruel that he did not listen to the beautiful prayers of his sister Devaki. He forcibly grabbed the newborn child to rebuke his sister and attempted to dash her on the stone mercilessly. This is a graphic example of a cruel brother who could sacrifice all relationships for the sake of personal gratification. But immediately the child slipped out of his hands, went up in the sky and appeared with eight arms as the younger sister of Visnu. She was decorated with a nice dress and flower garlands and ornaments; in her eight hands she held a bow, lancet, arrows, bell, conchshell, disc, club and shield.

Seeing the appearance of the child (who was actually the goddess Durga), all the demigods from different planets like Siddhaloka, Caranaloka, Gandharvaloka, Apsaroloka, Kinnaraloka, and Uragaloka presented her articles and began to offer their respective prayers. From above, the goddess addressed Kamsa: “You rascal, how can you kill me? The child who will kill you is already born before me somewhere within this world. Don’t be so cruel to your poor sister.” After this appearance, the goddess Durga became known by various names in various parts of the world.




Ravana kept watch the while, and when he saw Lakshmana leaving the hermitage, he assumed the guise of a forest sage and went towards the lonely and sad-hearted Sita. The jungle had grown silent. Ravana saw that Sita was beautiful as the solitary moon at midnight when it illumines the gloomy forest. He spake, saying: “O woman of golden beauty, O shy one in full bloom, robed in silk and adorned with flowers, art thou Sri, or Gauri, or the goddess of love, or a nymph of the forest? Red as coral are thy lips; thy teeth shine like to jasmine; love dwelleth in thine eyes so soft and lustrous. Slender art thou and tall, with shapely limbs, and a bosom like to ripe fruit…  Wherefore, O fair one, with long shining tresses, dost thou linger here in the lonesome jungle? More seemly it were if thou didst adorn a stately palace. Choose thee a royal suitor; be the bride of a king. What god is thy sire, O beautiful one?”

Sita honoured Ravana, believing that he was a Brahman. She told him the story of Rama’s exile, and said: “Rest thyself here until the jungle-ranging brethren return to greet thee.”

Then Ravana said: “No Brahman am I, but the ruler of the vengeful Rakshasas. I am Ravana, King of Lanka, dreaded by even the gods. Thy beauty, O fair one, clad in yellow silk, has taken captive my heart. Be my chief queen, O Sita, and five thousand handmaidens will wait upon thee. Share mine empire and my fame.”

Said Sita, whose eyes flashed fiery anger: Knowest thou Rama, the god-like hero who is ever victorious in strife? I am his wedded wife. Knowest thou Rama, the sinless and saintly one, who is strongly armed and full of valour and virtue? I am his wedded wife. What madness hath prompted thee to woo the wife of so mighty a warrior? I follow Rama as a lioness follows a lion. Canst thou, a prowling jackal, hope to obtain a lioness? Snatch from the jaws of a lion the calf which it is devouring, touch the fang of a cobra when it seizeth a fallen victim, or tear up a mountain by the roots, or seize the sun in heaven before thou dost seek to win or capture the wife of Rama, the avenger.”

Ravana boasted his prowess, saying: “I have power to slay even Yama. I can torture the sun and shoot arrows through the earth. Little dost thou know of my glory and my heroism.”

Then he changed his shape and stood up in gigantic demon form with vast body and ten heads and twenty arms…  Seizing Sita, he soared through the air with her as Garuda carries off the queen of serpents; he placed her in his chariot and went away swifter than the wind.

Ravana kept watch the while, and when he saw Lakshmana leaving the hermitage, he assumed the guise of a forest sage and went towards the lonely and sad-hearted Sita. The jungle had grown silent. Ravana saw that Sita was beautiful as the solitary moon at midnight when it illumines the gloomy forest. He spake, saying: “O woman of golden beauty, O shy one in full bloom, robed in silk and adorned with flowers, art thou Sri, or Gauri, or the goddess of love, or a nymph of the forest? Red as coral are thy lips; thy teeth shine like to jasmine; love dwelleth in thine eyes so soft and lustrous. Slender art thou and tall, with shapely limbs, and a bosom like to ripe fruit…  Wherefore, O fair one, with long shining tresses, dost thou linger here in the lonesome jungle? More seemly it were if thou didst adorn a stately palace. Choose thee a royal suitor; be the bride of a king. What god is thy sire, O beautiful one?”

Sita honoured Ravana, believing that he was a Brahman. She told him the story of Rama’s exile, and said: “Rest thyself here until the jungle-ranging brethren return to greet thee.”

Then Ravana said: “No Brahman am I, but the ruler of the vengeful Rakshasas. I am Ravana, King of Lanka, dreaded by even the gods. Thy beauty, O fair one, clad in yellow silk, has taken captive my heart. Be my chief queen, O Sita, and five thousand handmaidens will wait upon thee. Share mine empire and my fame.”

Said Sita, whose eyes flashed fiery anger: Knowest thou Rama, the god-like hero who is ever victorious in strife? I am his wedded wife. Knowest thou Rama, the sinless and saintly one, who is strongly armed and full of valour and virtue? I am his wedded wife. What madness hath prompted thee to woo the wife of so mighty a warrior? I follow Rama as a lioness follows a lion. Canst thou, a prowling jackal, hope to obtain a lioness? Snatch from the jaws of a lion the calf which it is devouring, touch the fang of a cobra when it seizeth a fallen victim, or tear up a mountain by the roots, or seize the sun in heaven before thou dost seek to win or capture the wife of Rama, the avenger.”

Ravana boasted his prowess, saying: “I have power to slay even Yama. I can torture the sun and shoot arrows through the earth. Little dost thou know of my glory and my heroism.”

Then he changed his shape and stood up in gigantic demon form with vast body and ten heads and twenty arms…  Seizing Sita, he soared through the air with her as Garuda carries off the queen of serpents; he placed her in his chariot and went away swifter than the wind.